A Fairy AND a Princess – The Very Fairy Princess: A Spooky, Sparkly Halloween by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton. Illustrated by Christine Davenier. Book Review.

 Click here to buy The Very Fairy Princess: A Spooky, Sparkly Halloween

This book is one in a collection of Very Fairy Princess books written by Julie Andrews and her daughter, Emma Walton Hamilton. Yes, I already reviewed one of her books, Dumpy to the Rescue, but it was so awful I thought I’d give her another chance.

In this book, she has taken two things that little girls love, fairies and princesses, merged them together and built a business of picture books, music, a television series, and even a writing course for authors. Her books are advertised as a #1 New York Times Best-selling Series. When scanning the list of books, you immediately realized that they are all written to help children in socially difficult situations such as the end of the school year, losing the class pet, and not being chosen to sing the solo.

In this particular story, Gerry, who is a princess with actual fairy wings, uses a white sheet to dress as an angel for Halloween. When her best friend, Delilah, wears a dentist uniform that becomes covered in ketchup, Gerry uses her ingenuity and generosity to save the day. She transforms her sheet into a tooth costume for her friend. Together they morph Gerry into the tooth fairy. The girls win a big box of chocolates for creative teamwork. I love the message that friendship and compassion are more important than looking good.

If the other books are like this one, I think they would be enjoyed by little girls and beneficial to their social development. The story was suspenseful; my granddaughter was quite concerned when Delilah’s costume was ruined just before the parade. The text is longer and the vocabulary is a bit more advanced than I would have expected for the target audience, but with adult assistance shouldn’t be a problem.

The pictures are created with soft pastels with a lot of pink and purple. The one thing I noticed was that in the classroom scenes I could only find one child of color. Perhaps Christine Davenier could be more conscious of diversity in her illustrations.

I will be reviewing other books written by celebrities in January. It will be interesting to see if celebrity authors develop a series of books like Julie Andrews or just a one-shot affair and if they have a message they want to spread.

By the way, this was about as “spooky” as a week old kitten.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Dumpy to the Rescue! By Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton. Illustrated by Tony Walton. Book Review.

 Click here to buy Dumpy to the Rescue! (My First I Can Read)

This is an “I Can Read Book”so I wasn’t expecting it to be big on plot. I was surprised to see it was published in 2004. It has the look of a much older book. I expected something a little less ‘traditional’ than an old red dump truck and a white male farmer with a white boy assisting him especially when you consider the diversity of children reading early books. Even the illustration style seem to be from the 1960s.

Dumpy is the farm truck. He brings hay for the cows, oats for the horse, chicks for the corn, but then can’t find the baby goat. As the farmer searches for the goat and feeds more animals, he discovers missing nuts, roses, milk, apples and even a hat. He finds baby goat in the barn full from all the food he has pilfered.

Just because the book is an early read, doesn’t mean it can’t have zest. Even with such a simple plot, the illustrations could’ve had punch and made children laugh. I honestly think most children would be bored stiff reading this.

When posting this review, I discovered there is a whole series of Dumpy books. Oh, well. Different tastes for different readers I guess.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Is There Really a Human Race? By Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell. Book Review.

 Click here to buy Is There Really a Human Race?

I thought this book was going to be about race relations but it was actually a play on the words “human race”. It begins at a park where a little boy asks his mother, “Is there really human race.”

The next page reads, “Is it going on now all over the place? When did it start? Who said, ‘Ready, Set, Go’?”

He continues talking about warm-ups, coaches, practicing and training. He asks about location, participants, winners and losers, rules, and if they are all going to crash.

Then it reads, “Sometimes it’s better not to go fast. There are beautiful sites to be seen when you’re last. Shouldn’t it be that you just try your best? And that’s more important than beating the rest? Shouldn’t it be looking back at the end that you judge her own race by the help that you lend.” It continues in this theme until the last line says, “and make the world a better place for the whole human race.”

The words were clever, well paced, rhythmic, and important. The rhyming was flawless. The message was delivered beautifully.

The book was illustrated by Laura Cornell who used pencil and watercolor. The pictures were full of dynamic and zany movement. Many of the pages had stories within the illustrations. Some crowded double-page spreads took quite a while to absorb. She definitely got across the idea of the insanity of competition and pushing ourselves as fast as possible.

Inside the back cover is a “world yearbook” that features various pictures of children and their career choices such as tech support, circus clown, mud brick master, astronaut, career criminal, clog dancer and nuclear physicist. Every portrait is bursting with personality.

All in all, this was a wonderful surprise. Highly recommended.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Poppa’s Goat written by Gary Hutchison. Illustrated by Gordon Court. Book Review.

This picture book tells the story of a grandfather who is fed up with the mess the paperboy makes delivering flyers. Instead of coming to the front door, the boy leaves the flyers on the front lawn where they blow all over the yard. Poppa’s granddaughter, Madeleine, comes to visit and misunderstands the phrase, “paperboy really gets his goat.”

Madeleine and Poppa build a box for the paperboy’s flyers and attach it to the fence in the front yard. Unfortunately, robins come and build a nest in the box so the papers wind up everywhere again. Madeleine and Poppa pick up the papers and create a papier-mâché figure representing the paperboy. The grandfather gives it to the dog who tears it to pieces. Funny and a little bit creepy at the same time.

Finally, the grandfather takes Madeline and their dog Stanley to a farm where they purchase a goat as a pet. Poppa specifically wants Little Goat to live in the backyard and eat the grass. But every Thursday, “he will go in the front yard and eat the flyers the paperboy puts on the ground. Goats love to eat paper.” The goat performs as expected. Madeleine and her grandparents celebrate with chocolate milk. The little goat curls up with the dog to sleep.

The illustrations are excellent. Gordon Court has an interesting angular style of drawing. Although the pictures are probably done on computer they feel close to hand drawn pen and ink outlines with color and shading.

The story is cute and funny and lends itself well to discussions of idioms, problem solving, and the raising of goats. On that last subject, please be sure to explain to the child that although goats love paper, giving it to them in great bunches as a regular diet is a bad idea. The paper has no nutritional value and a kid (baby goat) with a full stomach will not be able to eat his proper food to aid in growth. Eating too much paper can cause a blockage in the goat’s bowels, a major threat to his life. Flyers often contain toxic ink and full colored glossy pages are particularly poisonous. As well it looks like Poppa lives in the city where having a goat for a pet is not ideal. Be sure to explain to your child that this story is written just in fun.

The relationship between Madeleine and grandparents is positive and heartwarming. Perhaps you and your child could brainstorm as to how the two of them could solve this problem in a different way such as putting up a “No flyers please.” sign or hanging a paper box with a lid.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Avians by Timothy Gwyn. Book Review.

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Timothy Gwyn has built a fascinating and completely believable world in his first 416 page young adult science-fiction novel. His expertise with flying gives authenticity to the events without overwhelming the reader with technical jargon. Girls whose lives are miserable may be able to escape by joining the avians, an aeronautical group of young women fiercely loyal to each other and in love with flying glider planes used for commercial delivery and rescue missions.

The girls are as unique as their reasons for joining. However, not everyone will make it through training. So many girls are washed out or killed that the older flyers don’t bother to learn their names until the recruits have proven themselves. Even experienced aviators can fall victim to an accident. Then, they may be “converted”, a mysterious and frightening prospect.

Gwyn juxtapositions two girls from the same household, Raisa, heiress to a rich and influential silk empire and Mel, a servant in her household who detests Raisa. Both girls wind up in the same squad. The opportunity to sabotage Raisa is not lost on Mel. It seems likely that only one of these girls will make it, but which one?

Girls and women are the heroes of this novel and, not for a moment, are they dependent on men to reach their true potential. The rivalries are genuine as is the sisterhood. Science fiction readers of all ages will enjoy this book but it will especially connect with those who are interested in flight or empowering young women.

Buy links

Barnes and Noble 

Amazon

Timothy Gwyn will be interviewed tomorrow on this blog.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

The Check-Up: Oldbridge Tales by Mark Daydy. Illustrated by Mike Daydy. Book Review.

Book buy link http://a.co/ixsNgfz

Because of the differences in terminology the author and the illustrator have created an American version and an English version of the story. The book still has a definitely British feel to it. For example the taxi is black, I learned recently that they’re called “black cabs” and the protagonist, Jake, who seems to be a delivery truck, is yellow like North American taxis.

The story is fairly simple. Jake has smoke coming out of his engine but is afraid to go for a check-up. His friend, Sylvester, follows him around town telling everyone that Jake needs to go for a check-up. Jake refuses to listen insisting that he is too busy. But when his engine begins to choke up he realizes the seriousness of the situation and goes to the garage. He learns that all he needs is a new air filter, a painless experience. The story ends with Sylvester starting to smoke and Jake bugging him to go for a check-up. It could be quite funny if it is read with suitable expression.

The cars are old-fashioned cars, I think from the 30s, I’m not a car person so I don’t know for sure. This gives the book a certain charm. The illustrations by Mike Daydy are computer graphics. He does a good job of giving the cars expression. I would suggest that he vary the point of view of the illustration as most of them are taken from above looking down at an angle.

I think the story has two messages, one for children and one for adults. For children, the story reassures them that going to the doctor is usually not nearly as dramatic as they expect. For adults, it’s a reminder not to ignore symptoms that could be warnings of something more serious and that checkups for breast cancer or prostate cancer should never be postponed.

Children who enjoy books about cars may not even realize this book is actually about taking care of our bodies and our health. This could be a good thing for some children who don’t like to talk about going to the doctor. Sometimes a covert approach is the best.

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

The Tiny Hero of Ferny Creek Library by Linda Bailey. Illustrated by Victoria Jamieson. Book Review.

The Tiny Hero contains well-done black and white illustrations for each chapter.  There are 324 pages but the type is large and well spaced. This book is immediately engaging. Even though it is written for children ages seven to twelve, I was completely hooked.

The reader can’t help but love the little hero, Eddie, a tiny bug who braves the huge halls of the school, dodging a spider, a mouse, and lots of squishers (humans who stomp on bugs), in order to find his missing aunt.

Aunt Min is special. She has taught Eddie to read and told him many stories she overheard in the school library. These are books every child should experience from the works of Dr. Seuss to E.B. White. Avid readers will nod their heads with understanding whenever these books are mentioned. You may want to find those you haven’t read.

The novel supports reading and libraries at a time when many are shrinking or disappearing. Little Eddie reminds us of all the reasons we love a children’s library and why it cannot be replaced by a computer terminal.

The first quest for Eddie is to save his aunt and then protect his foolish little cousin who has followed him. The second one is to save the library from a substitute librarian (sister of a powerful administrator) who wants to board up its beautiful windows, remove all the books, and turn it into something less expensive. It seems an impossible task for a little bug to stop the demise of the beloved library when even the principal has trouble asserting himself but Eddie is committed and clever.

This endearing, suspenseful, and thoughtful book will connect with children and parents alike. There are acts of courage and sacrifice, a great deal of humor, subtle ethical topics, and tributes to our most cherished children’s books. I love how we see the world through the eyes of a small, defenseless creature who only wants to survive with his family. (A good discussion could follow about how some humans are “squishers” of small insects and how this contrasts with the compassion other people show to the small and defenseless.)

This book doesn’t touch on the topic of bullying but I believe if children are taught to show kindness to the smallest and most helpless, they are less likely to bully others or to be speciest. Little Eddie and his family are adorable ambassadors for compassion.

Highly recommended. Buy link http://a.co/bOOONR1

I was given a copy of this book for review.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

 

Seasons of Joy: Every Day is For Outdoor Play written and illustrated by Claudia Marie Lenart.

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Amazon BUY LINK http://a.co/ehGY3qn 

I previously reviewed a book that was illustrated by Lenart. I loved the illustrations and was greatly impressed by its uniqueness. I gave the book 5 stars. This picture book is Lenart’s first attempt at writing as well as illustrating. I am very pleased to see that she has competence in both areas.

The book explores the four seasons, three pages dedicated to each one. The story is written in poetic prose and although there are occasional rhymes, it does not try to be a rhyming book. On each page, children participate in imaginative, child driven, outdoor activities. For example, in spring, they play like otters in the water, create a fairy bed, and pretend they can fly like the butterflies. All the activities the children do are either free or inexpensive. All they need is a safe space outside and an imagination.

The prose is lovely.

“We sway to the wind’s song under crimson showers.”

“We play until the sun paints the trees a copper hue.”

The illustrations are even lovelier. I am amazed at what this artist can do with fibers. The deer looks as though it could leap off the page. The children are innocent and adorable without being saccharine. Many of the pictures would make beautiful prints for a nursery. I especially love the winter scene with the falling snow.

Highly recommended.

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for a review.

CLICK ON THE BOOK COVERS FOR MORE INFO OR TO BUY.

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Link to Prince Preemie review http://wp.me/p1OfUU-2nF

COME BACK TOMORROW FOR AN INTERVIEW WITH Claudia Marie Lenart.

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

 

Wolfie by Ame Dyckman. Book Review.

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 Click here to buy Wolfie the Bunny

Ame Dyckman answers the ever puzzling question of nature versus nurture. She comes down squarely on the side of nurture.

In this story, a wolf pup is left on the doorstep of a rabbit family. Mama and Papa instantly love the baby wolf but their daughter, Dot, lives in terror of being eaten. Wolfie, who constantly wears a pink bunny onesie, adores Dot and follows her everywhere. The wolf is raised on carrots but still grows to be more than twice the size of Dot who continues to keep her eye on him. When a bear tries to eat Wolfie, mistaking him for a pink bunny, Dot comes to her adopted brother’s rescue. After this, Wolfie adores her even more and Dot accepts and trusts him.

This is an hilarious story about the power of love and inclusion.

OHora outlines his characters in thick black lines. He uses only yellow, cream, white, green, black, red, pink, and grey in his pallet. There is no blue, purple, or brown. It gives the pictures a soft, sweet tone.

Whenever Dot is claiming, “He’s going to eat us all up!” the font changes, the letters are in bold text, and words are out of alignment. This brings home her dramatic terror.

This combination of writing and illustration has produced a book that is sure to be a family favorite.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Queek’s Race in Outer Space by Carrie Mortleman. Book Review.

 

This is a fairly challenging book for children just beginning to read longer texts or early chapter books which doesn’t seem to fit the idea of rhyming. Hellie the elephant and her friend, Queek the mouse, decide to go to Mars to challenge the aliens to a race. The aliens are generous hosts and the elephant wins by trumpeting and zipping across the finish line just ahead of the alien. The winner receives a prize supplied by the aliens. There are humorous and slightly suspenseful moments.

The first page reads:

  • Queek is a scrumptious sugar mouse
  • who glimmers in the sun.
  • He lives in a yummy cookie house
  • with Hellie, who loves to have fun.

The syllabication is off – seven, six, nine, seven. Writing in rhyme is not the best choice for most authors. The last line also klunks because the rhythm is broken.

Some of the sentences are awkward in order to make them rhyme.

  • Very tired from the flight, they landed, feeling blurry.
  • All the aliens stared in fright to see creatures so furry!

The next page reads:

  • Hellie the Hovercraft elephant is an elephant who can fly
  • she flitters and flutters
  • and splitters and splutters
  • and zooms up in the sky.

Since this book employs a lot of difficult words, I think it’s important to use them in their proper context. Splitters are devices for cutting software and splutters means to choke or spit. I understand that she is trying to make a rhyme but since there are so many other difficult words in the book, this could be confusing for a child starting to read larger books on his own. There are several large words used correctly such as frustration, tremendous, stupendous, precarious, hilarious, croissants. They often rhymes quite cleverly. There are also some odd phrasings like “feasted keenly.” and “a hefty blast”. The book ends with a glossary translating ten alien language statements.

On page 7, there is a knock knock joke coming out of nowhere which ends, “I must come in and use the toilet.” It features a sign on what appears to be a swirl of feces but later turns out to be Mars.

The illustration is an odd combination of flat drawings of the mouse and elephant and 3-D style computer graphics. This can be effective when the pictures are blended together carefully however most of these illustrations were not comfortable to the eye.

I received an e-book copy for review.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages