A Fairy AND a Princess – The Very Fairy Princess: A Spooky, Sparkly Halloween by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton. Illustrated by Christine Davenier. Book Review.

 Click here to buy The Very Fairy Princess: A Spooky, Sparkly Halloween

This book is one in a collection of Very Fairy Princess books written by Julie Andrews and her daughter, Emma Walton Hamilton. Yes, I already reviewed one of her books, Dumpy to the Rescue, but it was so awful I thought I’d give her another chance.

In this book, she has taken two things that little girls love, fairies and princesses, merged them together and built a business of picture books, music, a television series, and even a writing course for authors. Her books are advertised as a #1 New York Times Best-selling Series. When scanning the list of books, you immediately realized that they are all written to help children in socially difficult situations such as the end of the school year, losing the class pet, and not being chosen to sing the solo.

In this particular story, Gerry, who is a princess with actual fairy wings, uses a white sheet to dress as an angel for Halloween. When her best friend, Delilah, wears a dentist uniform that becomes covered in ketchup, Gerry uses her ingenuity and generosity to save the day. She transforms her sheet into a tooth costume for her friend. Together they morph Gerry into the tooth fairy. The girls win a big box of chocolates for creative teamwork. I love the message that friendship and compassion are more important than looking good.

If the other books are like this one, I think they would be enjoyed by little girls and beneficial to their social development. The story was suspenseful; my granddaughter was quite concerned when Delilah’s costume was ruined just before the parade. The text is longer and the vocabulary is a bit more advanced than I would have expected for the target audience, but with adult assistance shouldn’t be a problem.

The pictures are created with soft pastels with a lot of pink and purple. The one thing I noticed was that in the classroom scenes I could only find one child of color. Perhaps Christine Davenier could be more conscious of diversity in her illustrations.

I will be reviewing other books written by celebrities in January. It will be interesting to see if celebrity authors develop a series of books like Julie Andrews or just a one-shot affair and if they have a message they want to spread.

By the way, this was about as “spooky” as a week old kitten.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

The McVentures of Me, Morgan McFactoid – Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow! by Mark S. Waxman. Book Review.

51uaiqdcjul-_sx332_bo1204203200_

This is a humorous novel written for Junior grade children.

Morgan is a loner, not by choice but because he doesn’t seem to fit into the social landscape around him. He has a special relationship with his grandfather, Poppy, who encourages Morgan’s experimentation and attempts to invent new things.

Unfortunately, Morgan’s school life is dominated by a bully named Buckholtz. The bully is jealous that Morgan is already shaving and continually threatens him. This culminates in a promise to beat Morgan and shave his face and head. Morgan decides to invent a product that will remove facial hair without shaving. He believes if his red whiskers disappear, Buckholtz, who is three years older, will not feel the need to pummel him. However, because of the storm, his formula is changed and Morgan discovers something that is worth even more money than a hair removal product.

In the midst of all of this, a beautiful, smart and popular girl named Robin moves across the street. Morgan is shocked by her friendliness and her ability to spout random facts like he does. But Robin has mixed feelings about Morgan and his invention. Things get even more complicated when investors begin to bribe, woo, and threaten Morgan. In the end, Morgan has to decide what he values most.

Kids will love the humor, ethos, bumbling affection, and random facts scattered throughout this book. Morgan is a lovable and relatable character. Morgan’s final decision is sure to spark some interesting conversations. Well recommended.

Buy link. 

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Unforeseen Consequences – Erasable by Linda Yiannakis. Book Review.

smallcovererasable

If you read yesterday’s interview with Linda Yiannakis, you have already realised that Erasable is an intriguing novel for children.

The protagonist, nine-year-old Ellie, discovers something in her grandmother’s attic that promises to solve all her problems. But like the genie who grants three wishes, one never knows where magic will lead. Ellie has little understanding of the karmic results of her decisions. What begins as little improvements cascades into major life changes, not all positive.

I love how this book explains that one small action can have huge impacts on numerous people. It is impossible to tell what “erasing” something or someone from her life will cause. No one is immune to the results, not even Ellie.

The characters are likable. The family dynamics are realistic without being syrupy. The kids are kids, thoughtless and impulsive one minute, wonderful the next.

Yiannakis writes like a professional. The reader loses herself in the book. The prose is tight, the plot is trim, the dialogue is natural, and everything flows the way it should. It’s hard to believe this is Linda’s first book.

Although this book is targeted towards 9, 10 and 11-year-olds, it can be enjoyed by readers outside that age range. It would be a great book for a parent and child to read and discuss.

The book is not illustrated, per se, but there are little pen sketches dotted throughout. These are tiny, almost thumbnails, at the top of the chapter. I wondered why they weren’t larger.

All in all, this is an interesting, enjoyable, and thought-provoking read.

smilesmilesmilesmilesmile

Click on this link to buy Erasable

The Gingerbread Man (with a happy ending)

Most children are dismayed when the Gingerbread Man is eaten by the fox even though that’s what we do with cookies. In this version, not only is the Gingerbread Boy saved by the  little old lady who created him, but so are several other new friends he has made on his journey. This is a story of a different kind of family formed by love and compassion with a message of kindness to all.

The story contains repetitive phrases which children will enjoy reciting. The pictures were created using Legos, graphic illustration, and toys.

While you’re there, check out some of my educational and entertaining videos for kids, parents, and teachers. If you enjoy the site, give a video a thumbs up, subscribe, comment, and/or share.

 

Goodbye Days a Novel by Jeff Zentner. Book Review.

 
Goodbye Days buy link

Zentner understands survivor’s guilt at the deepest level. This is a story about the tragic deaths of three teenagers and the impact it has on the fourth friend and their families. Carver Briggs feels responsible for the death of his three best friends. He distracted the driver, Eli, with a text. Eli then crashed the vehicle and killed all the occupants. Each family responds differently to the deaths of their children and to Carver’s involvement.

But the story is really about Carver dealing with grief, death, fear and loneliness. Zentner describes a panic attack so vividly that you may catch yourself tensing in response. The only person who Carver can socialize with his the bereaved girlfriend of Eli, the driver. This raises complicated issues and feelings.

Blake’s grandmother, Betsy, asks Carver to spend the day reliving her special moments with her grandson, whom she has raised since four years of age. Carver, who is barely coping has mixed feelings about this event but agrees for the sake of the grandmother. This opens up a whole new can of worms with the other parents of the deceased teenagers.

The author stops the book from becoming a dirge by interspersing chapters of Carver’s silly, happy memories with his friends. But, the author also adds to the tension by raising the possibility that Carver will be sent to jail for his part in the deaths.

Zentner tells a story with great sensitivity and insight. The emotional depth portrayed by the protagonist and the other characters is realistic, insightful, and unforgettable. No matter whether you believe Carver contributed to the deaths or not, you will root for this young man in hopes that he can put his life back together. You will quickly become invested in the story and find yourself curling up in a corner and refusing to move until you are finished.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Helping Out a Friend – The Secret Path by Nancy Gee. Illustrated by Kathleen Newman. Book Review.

51u3gnfq65l

Click here to buy The Secret Path

This picture book is a sequel to The Secret Drawer which was reviewed on this blog February 27, 2017.

As the story unfolds, we discover that not only the flying squirrels but all the creatures of the forest have become friends with Maddie, the lady with the sock drawer, and Kitty. They decide to go down a path to Maddie’s house and give her the good news. What good news is still to unfold.

Instead of taking their usual path, they take a shortcut. Sal, one of the flying squirrels falls down into a hole and is trapped by a rock on her foot. It starts to rain and Sal is in danger of drowning. Each animal tries to get to her but is unsuccessful. Sal tells them to get Kitty. The animals race to Maddie’s house and, with gestures, convince the lady and cat to follow them. Turtle has placed himself over the hole to redirect the water but Sal is almost completely submerged. Kitty pulls her from the hole, Maddie wraps her up in a pink fluffy slipper, and the next day we learn the important news. Sal and Al have a litter of kits.

The illustrations have improved. The animals look more like woodland creatures and less like stuffed toys that have gone through the laundry without an anti-static sheet.

Although simple, this is a good story for children. Unfortunately, the author has chosen to write in rhyme again. Although it has improved somewhat, the beat seems a little awkward. There are twisted sentences such as, ” From a distance your cries we hear,/And you’re in trouble, we do fear.” In order to make the rhyme work, the author also uses some unfamiliar vocabulary for children. “Go find Kitty, he’ll fix my plight.” Although this is improved over her last book, I still contend that the story could be much better told without rhyme. It interferes with the pace and emotional connection to the story. It repeatedly pulls the reader out of the narrative. I would be interested in seeing this author tackle a picture book without rhyme. I think her storytelling skill would then come to the forefront.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

March 27, 2017 Review of the Secret Drawer on this blog.

March 29, 2017 Flying Squirrel Secrets: Author Nancy Gee Three Random Questions Interview on this blog.

A copy of this book was generously donated by the author to my Little Free Library.

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

When Is It OK for a Child to Paint a Wall? – Author Paulette Bogan – Three Random Questions Interview

Paulette Bogen has had her illustrations published in The New York Times, Ladies Home Journal, Business Week, Scholastic Magazines, Publishers Weekly, United Features Syndicate, and Newsday. She now writes and illustrates picture books. One of the books she illustrated, Chicks and Salsa, is featured on the PBS Children’s Show, Between the Lions!

Link to Between the Lion reading of Chicks and Salsa:

http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/rtttec13.ela.fdn.chicksalsa/chicks-and-salsa/

BossyFlossyAuthorPhotoFinal

Bonnie Ferrante: Hi Paulette. Welcome to my blog. I love the story of your first “artistic experience”. Would you share it with us now?

Paulette Bogan: We had the chicken pox, all four of us! My mother called us into the playroom and handed each of us a paintbrush and said, “Get started! This wall is boring.” And so we spent all afternoon (and the next few days) painting a mural on the playroom wall.

Ferrante: That’s one amazing mother.

You have 15 books listed on Goodreads. Do you write/illustrate full-time? How many hours a day to put into your work?

Bogan: I am a full time author and illustrator. I am useless in the morning as far as drawing, or writing, or even thinking clearly! Mornings are for exercise, chores, or my favorite – sleeping in.

Bogan: After noon I am much more creative and productive. I will spend the afternoon in my studio drawing, writing, or procrastinating. (Sometimes my best ideas come when I am procrastinating.)

studio B Ferrante P Bogan

Ferrante: How did you go from illustrating to both illustrating and writing your own picture books?

Bogan: I didn’t start writing professionally until I was in my thirties! I went to Parsons School of design and majored in illustration. My mother always told me I should write and illustrate children’s books. Of course I didn’t listen! I graduated art school and went on to do political illustration and editorial illustration for quite a few years.

I finally listened to my mother when I was pregnant with my first child. After a lot of hard work and many rejections, Nancy Paulsen at Putnam Children’s Books published my first book, Spike, in 1998! I’ve never looked back. Moms are always right. SpikeCover_Bogan

Click here to buy a copy of Spike

 

Ferrante: Which comes first for you, the illustrations or the story? What is your process?

Bogan: Sometimes I’ll have an idea for a story, and sometimes I’ll sketch a character and the story evolves around them. But because I’m an illustrator first, I always think visually.

 

Legal pad B Ferrante P Bogan

 

 

 

 

 

My writing process always starts on a legal yellow pad. I revise and edit on paper making a lot of scribbly sketches in the margins. After many edits I’ll go to the computer. The act of typing gives me another chance to look at my words and make more revisions.

My next step is thumbnails. Thumbnails allow me to see the whole book at once and understand how the story is flowing. Finally I will make a dummy. I like to sew the pages together and form a blank book then glue stick my pages in.Bossy Flossy thumbnails B Ferrnate P Bogan

Now it’s off to my editor for many more rounds of revisions and changes!

Dummy B Ferrante P Bogan

Ferrante: You were given Children’s Choice Book Award for Lulu the Big Little Chick. It’s about a little chick that runs away because she is sick of being told she’s too little to do things. How do you put yourself in the perspective of a small child?

Lulu the Big Little Chick cover Click here to buy Lulu the Big Little Chick

Bogan: I get inspiration and ideas for my stories from my childhood, my children, and everyday life! I never try to teach a lesson.

For instance, I was watching home video of my daughter Sophia when she was about six years old directing a play that starred her two little sisters and the dog. She was very bossy, but also very direct and concise about what she wanted. So when I was writing Bossy Flossy I tried to keep in mind her innocence, her directness, and her frustration. If I switch into thinking like an adult my writing becomes preachy and didactic.

Lulu the Big B Ferrante P Bogan

Ferrante Virgil & Owen and Virgil & Owen Stick Together are both “Mom’s Choice Awards Recipient” Gold Medal for Picture Books. Both books are about friendship. Why do you think they appeal so much to parents?

Bogan: Making friends is hard! Virgil and Owen are two “kids” with completely different personalities. Owen, the polar bear is quiet, steady, and sweet. He likes to think things through and take his time. Virgil, on the other hand can’t do things quickly enough, has a hard time sitting still, and is NOT a “look before you leap” kind of guy.

 Both Virgil & Owen and Virgil & Owen Stick Together provide an opportunity to talk about how friendships work, the importance of sharing, learning patience, and accepting each other’s differences.  Virgil and Owen show that “polar opposites” can be friends.
Click here to buy Virgil & OwenVirgil & Owen cover P. Bogan

 

 

 

 

Virgil & Owen pg. 16-17 B ferrnate p bogan

Virgil Owen Stick Together cover P. BoganClick here to buy Virgil & Owen Stick Together

Virgil Owen Stick Together page 30-31 B Ferrnate P Bogan

Ferrante: Spike in The City won the Children’s Book Council Children’s Choice Award in 2001. Spike in the Kennel was a 2002 IRA-CBC Children’s Choice. Tell us about Spike and why you think he appeals to readers.

Spike is an everyday, normal kind of guy. Sometimes he’s bored, sometimes he’s scared, and sometimes he makes mistakes. But like most children he learns a little each time he goes through something.

SpikeCityFrontCover_Bogan

Click here to buy Spike in the City
Ferrante: It seems that your books have messages for young children. Do you feel it is important for authors to help instill good values and social skills in their readers?

Bogan: I think if an author tries to hard to teach a lesson the book won’t work. The message has to come naturally through the characters and their personalities and the situations they get themselves into.

Ferrante: You have two books in progress, Bart the Bloodhound and One Dog. Can you tell us a little about them?

Bogan: Bart the Bloodhound is in contract with Henry Holt for Young Readers and is slated to come out Spring 2018. Bart is from a vampire family of dogs, but he is more “doggie” than vampire. He’s finding himself!

One Dog is a counting to ten book about a little boy who is a bit bored with his one sleepy pet – Dog. He has a dream that night and has quite an adventure with his not so sleepy dog! The two wake up happy to be together. One Dog is looking for a publisher!

One Dog Cats B Ferrante P Bogan

 

three random questions

Ferrante: If, for your next birthday, someone offered to make you the ultimate dessert of your choice, what great concoction would you request? Be deliciously specific.

Bogan: The ultimate dessert for me would last all day! For breakfast I’d start with a black and white milkshake so thick you need a spoon. Then for lunch I would like an angel food cake with chocolate icing.  For dinner I’d like a Chocolate Euphoria Cookie Bar, which consists of crushed Oreos, melted butter, chocolate drops, cereal, condensed milk, marshmallows, chocolate syrup, and white chocolate drops all layered and baked together!

I would end the day with a midnight snack of one scoop of coffee ice cream, and one scoop of sea salt and caramel ice cream.

Ferrante: When people find out that you are a picture book writer, what is the most typical question that they are likely to ask you regarding your job?

Bogan: #1 “Where do you get your ideas from?”

 #2 “How do you get published?”

Ferrante: Suppose that instead of having a name, you had a letter, and people would always refer to you as that letter. Which letter of the alphabet would you want to take the place of your name?

Well, my initials are PBJ, which is fun! But if I have to pick just one letter I am very attached to the letter P.

Letter P B Ferrnate P Bogan

 

 

 

Please come visit me at www.paulettebogan.com. and sign up for my newsletter to find out about new books, fun activities and appearances!

Listen to Paulette read Spike in the City 

Listen to Paulette read Lulu the Big Little Chick

Check out Paulette on facebook

 

A review of Bossy Flossy appeared on this blog on January 6, 2017.

Note: the three random questions are from “Chat Pack – Fun Questions to Spark Conversations”.

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

 

Finding the Truth Can Be Life Threatening: Something Stinks by Gail Hedrick. Book Review.

Click here to buy Something Stinks!

Something Stinks has received the Outstanding Science Trade Book award. With awards being given out left, right, and center, it is refreshing to see a book that has definitely earned its accolade. It is a fiction book, but the reader learns a great deal about water pollution, especially with regard to industry.

Emily is determined to find out why fish are showing up dead on the river banks by her aunt and uncle’s home. Her small town is suffering from job loss, so Emily’s investigations are less than popular. She decides to focus on an exposé for the school newspaper. Whatever industry she points the finger at may mean disaster for the company and, subsequently, the workers.

To make matters worse, her lifetime best friend, Leanne, is pulling away and hooking up with Cynthia, who is rich, spoiled, and bossy. Throw in more complications: her research is pointing toward the textile factory that employees many townspeople, Cynthia’s father owns that factory, the editor of the school newspaper is dating Cynthia, and Leanne wants Emily to leave things alone because she is maxed out on family drama. When trying to obtain water samples, Emily breaks the law and finds herself, and her new friends, in deep trouble.

As Emily researches the reader learns about incidents that can cause the death of fish such as a rise in temperature, dyes leaking into the water, and pesticides used by farms or golf courses.

The book is written in a comfortable style, with believable dialogue and enough suspense to keep the reader engaged. The editing is flawless. Each character is distinct and realistic. Emily becomes the reader’s hero, and like her, we want the fish killings resolved.

This would be a great book for readers aged 8 to 14. As an adult, I wasn’t bored for a minute and read it in one sitting.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

The author was interviewed on this on blog December 14, 2016.

rThe Scent of Something Sneaky was reviewed on this blog on December 5, 2016.

A copy of this book was generously donated by the author to my Little Free Library.

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

Wise and Beautiful – If You Plant a Seed by Kadir Nelson. Book Review.

22635853

 Click here to buy If You Plant a Seed

This stunningly beautiful book, with full color photographic-like illustrations, portrays animals realistically yet gives them human personalities.

A rabbit and mouse plant a tomato seed, a carrot seed, and a cabbage seed. They care for the garden until the plants are fully grown. When they harvest their work, five birds show up and stare at them, expecting the rabbit and mouse to share. At this point, you might expect this to become a Little Red Hen clone but it is so much more.

Through the exceptionally expressive illustration, Nelson shows the argument between the creatures which explodes into an all out food fight.

Afterward, mouse thoughtfully examines the cherry tomato and then offers it to the birds. The birds then use their flying ability to spread hundreds of seeds across the field. They help the mouse and rabbit care for the garden until the plants mature. Harvest time provides a wider variety of vegetables in plentiful quantities.

The sparse words are profound and exquisite.

“If you plant a tomato seed, a carrot seed, and a cabbage seed, in no time, with love and care, tomato, carrot, and cabbage plants will grow. If you plant a seed of selfishness, in a very short time, it will grow, and grow and grow into a heap of trouble. But if you plant a seed of kindness, in almost no time at all, the fruits of kindness will grow, and grow, and grow, and they are very, very sweet.”

This remarkable little book uses nature to illustrate our karmic consequences. We may think we are only planting vegetables but, by our actions, we are planting our lives.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

The Golden Rule by Sherrill S. Cannon. Illustrated by Kalpart.

 

As appears evident from the title of this book, it is the type of text one would use with Sunday school children or perhaps young schoolchildren. The premise seemed interesting. “Robert and Kait decide to look for the Golden ruler that their Mom has told them about, only to find out that she meant rule instead of ruler.” I thought there would be more of a search and more humor involved. This search takes three of the eleven pages. I had anticipated that the search would connect and lead into the value of the Golden rule but the two sections are completely isolated.

While searching, Kait asks Rob if it might be a ruler they can’t see. He thinks for a minute and realizes that it is a rule. Then suddenly he begins to explain it.

“It’s not a school ruler, or measuring tool…

It’s a rule that you live by, to give and to share,

A way to treat others to show that you care.”

From that point on the book explains how to treat others properly. It talks about thinking with head and heart, sharing, dealing with bullies, paying it forward, inclusion, and honesty.

The story is written in rhyme which is always difficult to do well. The rhythm and beat suit this style of book and are mostly consistent. For example:

The rule is treat others the way you would like

For them to treat you, and treat all just alike.

The rule is not something that money can buy.

It’s more of a way to help feel good inside.

And thinking of others is also a part

Of that rule, which means thinking with head and with heart.

The illustrations are reminiscent of old comic books but the characters have large heads and small bodies. The author has worked to be diverse. Of the eight children four are girls, and two are of African descent.

I believe this book is suited to a church or group library. It’s not the kind of book that a child will ask to hear again and again. I was hoping the message would be a little more subtle but these books do have their place.

I was given a free paperback copy of this book to donate to my Little Free Library in exchange for an honest book review.

thumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tinythumb-up-smile-tiny

Click on the cover to buy a copy.

Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages