Morris, Stan. Surviving the Fog: Kathy’s Recollections

Click here to buy Kathy’s Recollections (Surviving the Fog Book 2)

Kathy’s Recollections: Surviving the Fog was an unusual book. The first chapter seem to be much the same as Stephen King’s The Fog but the similarity ended there. The reader is inadvertently led to believe the story will be about the struggle against fog monsters but they play a miniscule part in the plot. In fact, I thought a more mundane method of disaster might have set the more appropriate tone for the rest of the story.

This is a post apocalypse novel featuring a summer camp of young people as survivors. It was the opposite of Lord of the Pigs. Although there were evil villains, they came from outside the camp.

It was an interesting novel more than suspenseful. Although there were seriously dramatic scenes filled with life and death situations, the tone was that of a “recollection” and so felt more like telling than showing. With a different voice, this story could have been as suspenseful as The Maze.

Stan Morris makes us care deeply for the key teenagers and their patchwork society. I did, however, find it difficult to believe the 14-year-old “Chief” would be so mature, responsible, and insightful. If world leaders were this in tune with the needs of their people, there would be no wars or rebellions. The narrator, Kathy, develops from a frightened, helpless girl into a decisive mother figure. The characters were varied and complex.

This novel reminded me of pioneer stories where good people struggle against starvation, attacks, freezing temperatures, and the unknown. Stan Morris clearly explained how the children, with the help of a young man named Hector and later other adults, created a habitat in which they could survive the long, icy winters. Either intense research or a wide knowledge base was necessary to create these authentic scenes. While these descriptions made the story believable, at times they were more detailed than necessary. Ingenuity, hard work, commitment, and amazing good luck came together in the right combination for survival.

As expected, the teenagers quickly paired off. Sexuality and sexual intercourse were dominant themes throughout the book, although there were no explicit descriptions. This is entirely believable for a group of teenagers left without adult supervision.

I really enjoyed reading a post-apocalypse book that focused on the positive. Even though there were the usual horrors, thievery, violence, kidnapping, rape, etc., they were used to highlight the mature and humanec responses of the teenagers. Instead of descending into barbarism, the young people rose to the challenge and shone. An enjoyable read.

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


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