Gordon, Scott. Froggy Dearest. Illustrations by Sebastian Kaulitzki, Konstantin Grishin, and Julien Tromeur. Book Review.

Click here to buy Froggy Dearest (Kiss me, my love!)

In this book, the frog speaks directly to the reader as the object of his affection. He tries to convince the reader of his worth as a sweetheart. All he wants is a kiss. This will turn him back to the fierce king he once was. Through promises and flattery he does convince the object of his affection to kiss him transforming him into… Well, I wouldn’t want to ruin the surprise.

The author says that this book was originally written for children aged 3 to 6, but he changed his mind and now recommends it for parents to read to their children. Even so, I would say it was for older children than that. Some of the vocabulary such as “token”, “lowly”, “latte – caramel macchiato” “multiplex”, “stereoscopic”, “angelic”, “vibrant”, and “radiating” would be too difficult for a child under 11 years old. An expressive parent of a child between the ages of seven in 10 might be able to get across the context without too much stopping and explaining. Most children would be unable to read it by themselves, even after hearing it once, not only because of the vocabulary but because the text is a fancy script.  I actually think this book would be enjoyed by tweens and up the most.

The illustrations are amazing. The three-dimensional digital drawings look like they stepped right out of a Pixar movie. The frog is adorable. I did find the pictures somewhat bare after a while.

Well recommended, but not really for children.

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Bonnie Ferrante: Books For All Ages

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One thought on “Gordon, Scott. Froggy Dearest. Illustrations by Sebastian Kaulitzki, Konstantin Grishin, and Julien Tromeur. Book Review.

  1. Bonnie, I just once again had a discussion about vocabulary for kids and it’s sort of a toss up. Vocabulary a step above forms as a vocabulary builder, but if there are too many, it ruins the story ’cause you’re pulled out of it too frequently into a dictionary or an explanation. I don’t have a problem with some words having to be explained and learned though.

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